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Cantril

Cantril - General Information

Cantril is a post-ganglionic parasympathetic inhibitor. It decreases gastric acid and pepsin secretion and suppresses spontaneous contractions of the colon. Cantril diminishes gastric acid and pepsin secretion. Cantril also suppresses spontaneous contractions of the colon. Pharmacologically, it is a post-ganglionic parasympathetic inhibitor. It has not been shown to be effective in contributing to the healing of peptic ulcer, decreasing the rate of recurrence, or preventing complications.

 

Pharmacology of Cantril

Cantril diminishes gastric acid and pepsin secretion. Cantril also suppresses spontaneous contractions of the colon. Pharmacologically, it is a post-ganglionic parasympathetic inhibitor.

 

Additional information about Cantril

Cantril Indication: For use as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of peptic ulcer. It has not been
shown to be effective in contributing to the healing of peptic ulcer, decreasing the rate of recurrence, or preventing complications.
Mechanism Of Action: Cantril is a post-ganglionic parasympathetic inhibitor. It decreases gastric acid and pepsin secretion and suppresses spontaneous contractions of the colon.
Drug Interactions: Not Available
Food Interactions: Not Available
Generic Name: Mepenzolate
Synonyms: 1-Methyl-3-piperidyl benzilate methyl bromide; Mepenzolate bromide; Mepenzolic acid; N-Methyl-3-piperidyl benzilate methyl bromide; N-Methyl-3-piperidyldiphenylglycolate methobromide
Drug Category: Anticholinergic Agents; Parasympatholytics
Drug Type: Small Molecule; Approved

Other Brand Names containing Mepenzolate: Cantil; Cantilaque; Cantilon; Cantril; Colibantil; Colopiril; Colum; Delevil; Eftoron; Gastropidil; Mepenzolon; Tralanta; Trancolon;
Absorption: Between 3 and 22% of an orally administered dose is excreted in the urine over a 5-day period, with the majority of the radioactivity appearing on Day 1. The remainder appears in the next 5 days in the feces and presumably has not been absorbed.
Toxicity (Overdose): The signs and symptoms of overdosage are headache; nausea; vomiting; blurred vision; dilated pupils; hot, dry skin; dizziness; dryness of the mouth; difficulty in swallowing; and CNS stimulation. A curare-like action may occur (i.e., neuromuscular blockade leading to muscular weakness and possible
paralysis). The oral LD50 is greater than 750 mg/kg in mice and greater than 1000 mg/kg in rats.
Protein Binding: Not Available
Biotransformation: Not Available
Half Life: Not Available
Dosage Forms of Cantril: Tablet Oral
Chemical IUPAC Name: (1,1-dimethylpiperidin-1-ium-3-yl) 2-hydroxy-2,2-di(phenyl)acetate
Chemical Formula: C21H26NO3
Mepenzolate on Wikipedia: Not Available
Organisms Affected: Humans and other mammals