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Lincocine

Lincocine - General Information

An antibiotic produced by Streptomyces lincolnensis var. lincolnensis. It has been used in the treatment of staphylococcal, streptococcal, and Bacteroides fragilis infections. [PubChem]

 

Pharmacology of Lincocine

Lincocine is a lincosamide antibiotic that comes from the yeast Streptomyces lincolnensis. Lincocine has been shown to be active in vitro against the following microorganisms: Aerobic gram-positive cocci: Streptococcus pyogenes and Viridans group streptococci; Aerobic gram-positive bacilli: Corynebacterium diphtheriae; Anaerobic gram-positive non-sporeforming bacilli: Propionibacterium acnes; Anaerobic gram-positive sporeforming bacilli: Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens.

 

Lincocine for patients

Patients should be counseled that antibacterial drugs including LINCOCIN should only be used to treat bacterial infections. They do not treat viral infections (e.g., the common cold). When LINCOCIN is prescribed to treat a bacterial infection, patients should be told that although it is common to feel better early in the course of therapy, the medication should be taken exactly as directed. Skipping doses or not completing the full course of therapy may (1) decrease the effectiveness of the immediate treatment and (2) increase the likelihood that bacteria will develop resistance and will not be treatable by LINCOCIN or other antibacterial drugs in the future.

 

Lincocine Interactions

Lincomycin has been shown to have neuromuscular blocking properties that may enhance the action of other neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, it should be used in caution in patients receiving such agents.

Antagonism between lincomycin and erythromycin in vitro has been demonstrated. Because of possible clinical significance, the two drugs should not be administered concurrently.

 

Lincocine Contraindications

This drug is contraindicated in patients previously found to be hypersensitive to lin-comycin or clindamycin.

 

Additional information about Lincocine

Lincocine Indication: Used in the treatment of staphylococcal, streptococcal, and Bacteroides fragilis infections.
Mechanism Of Action: Lincocine inhibits protein synthesis in susceptible bacteria by binding to the 50 S subunits of bacterial ribosomes and preventing peptide bond formation. It is usually considered bacteriostatic, but may be bactericidal in high concentrations or when used against highly susceptible organisms.
Drug Interactions: Aluminium The aluminium salt decreases the absorption of lincosamides
Attapulgite The aluminium salt decreases the absorption of lincosamides
Erythromycin Possible antagonism of action
Kaolin The aluminium salt decreases the absorption of lincosamides
Atracurium The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Doxacurium The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Vecuronium The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Tubocurarine The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Succinylcholine The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Rocuronium The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Pipecuronium The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Pancuronium The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Mivacurium The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Metocurine The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Gallamine Triethiodide The agent increases the effect of muscle relaxant
Food Interactions: Take on an empty stomach, food decreases absorption.
Generic Name: Lincomycin
Synonyms: LCM; Lincomycine; Lincomyocin; Lincomycin hydrochloride
Drug Category: Anti-Bacterial Agents
Drug Type: Small Molecule; Approved
Other Brand Names containing Lincomycin: Lincocin; Lincocine; Lincolcina; Lincolnensin; Lincomix; Lincomix 20; Pura Ject 100; Mycivin; Lincorex;
Absorption: Rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract following oral administration. Approximately 20 to 30% absorbed orally in fasting state; absorption decreased when taken with food.
Toxicity (Overdose): Not Available
Protein Binding: Protein binding decreases with increased plasma concentrations. Range, 28 to 86% (average, 70 to 75%). Albumin is not thought to be the primary binding component.
Biotransformation: Presumed hepatic, however metabolites have not been fully characterized.
Half Life: The biological half-life after intramuscular or intravenous administration is 5.4 ± 1.0 hours. The serum half-life of lincomycin may be prolonged in patients with severe impairment of renal function compared to patients with normal renal function. In patients with abnormal hepatic function, serum half-life may be twofold longer than in patients with normal hepatic function.
Dosage Forms of Lincocine: Solution Intravenous
Chemical IUPAC Name: (4R)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-hydroxy-1-[(2R,3R,4S,5R,6R)-3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-methylsulfanyloxan-2-yl]propyl]-1-methyl-4-propylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide
Chemical Formula: C18H34N2O6S
Lincomycin on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincomycin
Organisms Affected: Enteric bacteria and other eubacteria